Does NeckRelax Work For Seniors?

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1 in 3 people experience neck pain at least once a year, with women being affected more than men [1]. Typically, the pain is temporary, but as people age, the risk of persistent neck pain increases dramatically…

Does NeckRelax work for seniors?

Neck pain can also be very difficult to treat, partly because there is a wide array of possible causes behind it.

If you’ve tried seemingly everything with zero effect, NeckRelax might turn out to be the solution you’ve been looking for!

 

How Does NeckRelax Work?

Have pain? NeckRelax can help!

So how can NeckRelax help seniors, and how does it even work?

NeckRelax relies on three technologies to treat neck pain – high-frequency electrical pulses, infrared thermal technology, and magnetic fields. Like we usually do with devices that claim to treat body pain, we had a look into existing studies on the methodologies used in NeckRelax.

It turns out the technology used in NeckRelax has some real validity to it, and research into similar treatments is very promising.

One study set out to investigate the effects of electrotherapy, and it discovered that the treatment is effective at reducing stiffness in the gastrocnemius muscle (part of the calf muscle) [2].

When it comes to infrared therapy, a 2006 study from the Pain Research & Management found that infrared radiation noticeably reduced chronic back pain with no side effects [3].

Another study found that far-infrared treatment did improve neck muscle stiffness in participants, but researchers concluded that further exploration is necessary for definite results [4].

As for magnetic fields, some trials have shown potential, but there was little data for solid conclusions as of this post’s writing [5].

With that in mind, NeckRelax does appear to use legit and effective technology.

If you have neck pain, NeckRelax is likely to help you no matter your age. But given that the occurrence of neck pain in seniors is high, NeckRelax could be a particularly good investment for those in their golden years.

 

How Do You Use NeckRelax?

A person with NeckRelax and its electrode pads.

NeckRelax is shaped like a band and is intended to be placed on your neck. Once you do comfortably place the device around your neck, you turn it on and choose the intensity setting.

You may also switch between the device’s high-frequency and infrared modes and see which one works the best for you. Aside from that, each NeckRelax device comes with a set of electrode pads that may be placed anywhere on the body for targeted pain relief.

NeckRelax is advertised to take only 10 minutes to deliver visible results. No setup is necessary to use NeckRelax as well – it’s ready to go out of the box. You can even use the device while working or doing household chores!

 

Does NeckRelax Work For Seniors? Is It A Good Investment?

A person holding NeckRelax.

NeckRelax appears promising, and there seems to be solid scientific evidence behind the technologies used within it. Its also covered by a 30-day refund policy just in case you’re not satisfied.

Also, at the moment of this guide’s writing, NeckRelax is heavily discounted, especially with multi-unit purchases. You could buy 4 NeckRelax devices at a 60% discount! If you don’t need that many devices, then you can still get one NeckRelax for a huge discount as well!

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PS – By the way, another treatment you could try is the Neck Hammock by Dr. Steve Sudell. The Neck Hammock is similar to NeckRelax, but it’s requires that you lie down during the therapy, and works through something called “cervical traction”.

 

Sources:
  1. “Neck pain: Overview”, InformedHealth.org, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK338120/.
  2. “Therapeutic effects of massage and electrotherapy on muscle tone, stiffness and muscle contraction following gastrocnemius muscle fatigue”, Journal of Physical Therapy Science, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5300827/.
  3. “Infrared therapy for chronic low back pain: A randomized, controlled trial”, Pain Research & Management, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2539004/.
  4. “Effects of far-infrared irradiation on myofascial neck pain”, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24152215/.
  5. “What is Magnetic Field Therapy?”, WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/magnetic-field-therapy-overview.
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